S5: Digital technology for non-pharmacological therapy and real world monitoring in dementia care

Digital technology for non-pharmacological therapy and real world monitoring in dementia care – a potential future model for delivering personalized medicine at scale

Nick Hird, Digital technology for non-pharmacological therapy and real world monitoring in dementia care, OpenTox Asia 2018
PRESENTING AUTHOR: 

Nick Hird

INSTITUTION / COMPANY : 

Aikomi Corp. Japan

POSITION: 

Research Scientist

ABSTRACT CONTENT / DETAILS: 

Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a major unmet need in dementia care that affects over 90% of persons with dementia (PWD) and is responsible for poor quality of life and increased medical costs for both PWD and their caregivers. There are currently no effective treatments for BPSD and most best practice seeks to minimize use of drugs where possible due to risk of serious adverse effects and instead promote use non-pharmacological interventions (NPIs). However, the effectiveness of most NPIs such as cognitive training, reminiscence and music therapy remains limited and there is increasing interest in investigating emerging digital technologies to improve the effectiveness and usage of NPIs. Aikomi is Japan-based start-up healthcare technology company developing novel tools to support NPIs for BPSD and dementia care using personalized multi-sense stimulation and behavior monitoring, Aikomi`s IoT and AI enabled technology platform is powered by Garuda and has been developed in collaboration with SBX Corporation, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, JVCKenwood and scent technology company Promotool. Evaluation is being conducted with an ecosystem of dementia care experts to ensure development of practical tools to support implementation of person centered care in dementia. While the primary focus is on personalized NPIs, a key aspect of this project is real world monitoring of PWD in order to detect and understand trends in behavior change. Real world evidence (RWE) is not only essential to personalizing NPI therapy, it is also crucial to understanding well-being and distress. In the wider context, the recent widespread availability of technologies for unobtrusively monitoring behavior in “at home” environments may herald a new analysis paradigm for insights into patient outcomes and adverse effects. Thus, individual phenotypic data, combined with existing personal medical history and drug profile and toxicology data could enable personalized and context-rich understanding of therapeutic interventions and enable implementation at scale of holistic and personalized medical practice. This talk will overview Aikomi`s work on NPI and suggest future visions for use of RWE to improve treatments for BPSD as well as overcoming the major issue of polypharmacy in dementia and elderly care.