Session 5 Chair: Clemens Wittwehr

Clemens Wittwehr

Session 5 Chair: Clemens Wittwehr
PRESENTING AUTHOR: 

Clemens Wittwehr

INSTITUTION / COMPANY : 

JRC

SESSION DESCRIPTION: 

Regulatory decision makers in all areas are drowning in peer-reviewed journal papers, while what they would need is succinct knowledge distilled from the information flood. The success of a concept like the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) shows that there is a solution to this paradox, and that people working in the overlapping areas of applied science and policy formulation are more than ready for a quantum leap in the way they gain insight into scientific issues and how they can apply the acquired knowledge to their respective areas: The success of the knowledge driven AOP approach to underpin the collaborative reasoning on causal relationships between the steps of a chain of events leading to an ultimate biological outcome (good or bad) shows that giving researchers and policy makers an antidote to the epidemic of scientific fragmentation and hyper-specialisation by inviting them to capture and share their understanding of complex phenomena in one easy-to-understand paradigm is eagerly welcomed: Not only is knowledge aggregated and finally made useful to all community members, in addition informal networks are established between parties that were not even aware of each other previously, and a common vocabulary for the shared domain emerges.

However, as John Naisbitt said, "We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge", and the key success factor for turning today's information deluge into useful knowledge is integrating data and making them interoperable.

This session will demonstrate current initiatives to achieve this goal, be it through globally agreed data reporting templates (OHT 201), semantic annotation to make public data easier to understand, to consume and to combine, open access data resources (ELIXIR), and real-life demonstrations of an AOP in research environments using the examples of Liver Fibrosis and Carcinogenicity.